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STOP THE CRISIS OF
Preventable
Blindness

Three quarters of cases of vision loss in Canada are preventable.

Tell the Canadian government to recommit to a national vision health plan today. Over 8 million Canadians are living with diseases that can lead to blindness — act now, their time is running out.

Canadian Council of the Blind
Fighting Blindness Canada
Canadian Association of Optometrists
Canadian Ophthalmologic Society

Update
The Impact of
COVID-19

1,437 CANADIANS

Experienced Vision Loss Due
to Delayed Eye Care

Eye

$1.3 BILLION

Increase in the Cost of VIsion
Loss & Blindness Caused
by Surgery Wait Times

Chart

3 MILLION

Fewer Optometry Visits in 2020

Eye

143,000 EYE SURGERIES

Cancelled or Delayed in 2020

To the Cost of Vision Loss and Blindness in Canada

Update
The Impact of
COVID-19

1,437 CANADIANS

Experienced Vision Loss Due
to Delayed Eye Care

Eye

$1.3 BILLION

Increase in the Cost of VIsion
Loss & Blindness Caused
by Surgery Wait Times

Chart

3 MILLION

Fewer Optometry Visits in 2020

Eye

143,000 EYE SURGERIES

Cancelled or Delayed in 2020

To the Cost of Vision Loss and Blindness in Canada

Vision Loss Costs Canadians $32.9 Billion

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THREE QUARTERS
OF PEOPLE CAN PREVENT BLINDNESS IF DIAGNOSED EARLY

We need simple, equitable solutions for all Canadians and a special focus on youth, the elderly and other at-risk populations. Together, we can reduce our economic burden and save the sight of countless Canadians.


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$9.5 BILLION
IS SPENT YEARLY ON DIRECT HEALTH COSTS

Including the costs of hospitals and day surgeries, services provided by ophthalmologists, optometrists or opticians, pharmaceuticals, eyewear and other health system expenditures


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$6 BILLION
IS SPENT YEARLY ON INDIRECT HEALTH COSTS AND LOST PRODUCTIVITY

Due to reduced workforce participation, reduced productivity at work, additional time off work, loss of future earnings due to premature mortality and loss of
caregivers’ income.


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$17.4 BILLION
IS THE COST TO WELL-BEING

Including out of pocket expenses on formal aged and disability care, aids, equipment and home modifications, and efficiency losses associated with the transfer of resources within the economy

Join our community of passionate supporters who are committed to ending preventable blindness in Canada.

We’re Calling On The Government To Recommit To A Vision Health Plan

Making eye health and rehabilitation services a population health priority requires meaningful federal support that includes:

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An evidence-based strategy supported by a vision desk

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Microscope

Increased research funding

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Needle

A consistent and reliable supply of medication required to treat eye disease and conditions

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Door

Enhanced access to care for Indigenous people and priority populations

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Funding to support eye health education programs

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Make equitable vision health for all Canadians a priority

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Picture of Eye Research Lab Technician

Pierre’s Story

Clinical Trials in Canada Grant Access to New Sight-Saving Innovations


I’m visually-handicapped, but I don’t think about this every day. I try to make the most of my life.

I’m very happy with my life, I volunteer for the Groupement des âgés du transport adapté des patriots, and I sing in a choir with visually-impaired people living with vision loss.

It wasn’t always this way, though. When I became officially blind at age 32, it changed my life completely. The life I had planned for myself completely disappeared. You need good eyes to be a mechanic.

By the age of 64, I’d given up hope of ever getting to benefit from any such innovations. But I was lucky, and I was chosen for a clinical trial study. Through this study, I had a sight-restoring operation.

After the operation, I could see things that I couldn’t before. At the hair salon, I noticed the barber’s pole, with it’s rotating blue, red, and white stripes. I could suddenly see the dark green of the grass, and the twinkling Christmas lights that I install outside every year.

I have 4 children and 6 grandchildren. My children didn’t inherit my disease, but 2 of my grandsons did.

This is part of why research is so important to me, and why I agreed to participate in the clinical study.

I do it for myself, and for my grandsons.

Pierre Langlois
Saint-Eustache, QC
Choroideremia

SPREAD THE WORD
Fight for a Canada without blindness.

Show your support for the crisis of preventable blindness by sharing the assets in our social media toolkit. Help us demand change today – no Canadian should go blind from a preventable disease.

Share the
petition now

Tell the world about
the crisis of preventable blindness

Thank you to our partners

Learn more about the organizations whose generous support have made this report possible